Addicted to novelty since 2001

Browse the Nation’s Front Pages

Stephen Taylor has built a nifty front page viewer for the country’s major newspapers (well, major newspapers and 24 Hours). It works the same way you navigate album covers in iTunes. From Stephen’s blog post introducing the viewer:

I also designed this application as a media monitoring/research tool. A significant number of Canadians get their news from Canadian newspapers and some researchers may find it worthwhile to track the evolution of a story as expressed to Calgarians via the Herald, or to Torontonians via the Sun, to give two examples. To illustrate another example of this tool’s use, one might find it interesting to see how the National Post was covering the Conrad Black trial in comparison to other newspapers. Further, some believe that papers cheer for political parties during elections.

It’s not the slickest Flash design I’ve ever seen, but it gets the job done. My feature request: let us zoom in on the pages, at least far enough to read all the headlines and subheads.

I’ve included a photo of Prime Minster Harper throwing a snowball because, well, Stephen Taylor’s a Conservative and our man in Ottawa has lovely throwing form.

4 Responses to “Browse the Nation’s Front Pages”

  1. Alice in Wonderland

    Re Harper’s picture – and here I thought he was doing the Hussle.

  2. ChrisK

    I love the Google ads that you are getting for this story (for my visit at least):

    [Tax Fairness Plan]
    Finance Minister Jim Flaherty looks out for Canadian taxpayers.
    – I suspect this is because it’s based on the Canadian government content…

    [Is Campbell listening?]
    One sided conversations won’t help. Carole James has health solutions.
    – I suspect this is because it’s got some political triggers and I’m coming from BC.

    [Date Liberal Canadians]
    Single? Data Intelligent Liberals Who Share Your Values And Politics.
    – Someone must love Stephen Harper?

  3. Todd Sieling

    Meh. A bad rip of coverflow. If this is for comparison, then one by one doesn’t work. Choosing up to, say, 4 papers and seeing them all at once would work better, I think.

    And, 24? 24?! C’mon! :D

Comments are closed.