Addicted to novelty since 2001

Essays to Help People Get the Web

I recommend the same essays about the web over and over again. Essays like 1000 True Fans or The Next Economy of Ideas are both informative and inspiring, and convey fundamental ideas about how the web works.

When I say “how the web works”, I’m not talking about DNS or HTTP. I’m referring to the profound impact that the web is having on community, commerce, communications and so many other parts of our lives. It’s these big ideas that are difficult to absorb, and I find the essays help.

James does the same thing, and he came up with the idea of curating a book (maybe it’s electronic, maybe hard copy, maybe both) that showcases a bunch of the best essays. In short, a toolkit for getting the web.

We were at a business retreat up in Tofino this weekend, and we hashed out the idea a little. Following the best advice of Ze Frank (rude words ahead), we started implementing the idea on the spot. Hence, GettheWeb.org. For now it’s just a Google Sites page with a Google Docs form and a YouTube video (owned by Google) explaining the project.

At this stage, we’re just looking for recommendations for “great essays about how the web works–socially, behaviorally, philosophically”. Plus we made a 78-second video discussing the project (thanks to Jay from Giant Ant for being our two-elbow duopod):

Have you got an essay about the web that you love? Submit it.

4 Responses to “Essays to Help People Get the Web”

  1. Laurence Miall

    This article is not as uplifting as Kevin Kelly’s, but it made major waves in the traditional news media. “Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable.”

    I think it’s done the rounds by now so sorry if I’m not providing anything new!

    http://www.shirky.com/weblog/2009/03/newspapers-and-thinking-the-unthinkable/

    darren Reply:

    Thanks for the suggestion. Indeed, somebody else has recommended that great essay as well, so we’ll definitely keep it in mind. I can’t imagine creating such a book and not including something from Clay Shirky.

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