Darren Barefoot
Darren Barefoot

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Commentary on sports (mostly, but not exclusively, hockey).

Wednesday, June 25, 2003

Way back in the day, I used to work as a receptionist and admin guy for the Oak Bay Recreation Centre in Victoria. It was a fine job, and the only unionized one I've ever had. We were also back-up lifeguards for those on the pool deck, and so there were certain procedures we had to get familiar with. I just found a copy of the following one in some old correspondence:

DATE:  September 27, 1996
TO:  All Aquatic Staff, Maintenance and Receptionists
RE: Fecal Incidents In Pool Water


If there is a fecal incident in the pool, please follow these steps:

1. Lifeguards will clear the pool which the incident occurred in.

2. Lifeguards will remove the fecal matter from the pool.  If the accident occurred in the big pool, maintenance will probably close a portion of the big pool.

3. Maintenance follows pool superchlorination procedures and informs both pool staff and reception as to the length of pool closure.

4. Reception gives out courtesy passes to affected patrons.  If lessons are canceled, Reception ensures credits are put on lesson participants accounts.  If other classes are affected by pool closure, Reception calls lesson participants to inform them that the pool is closed for ___hours due to maintenance problems.

5. The Aquatic Coordinator or Programmer will take care of staffing concerns.  In their absence, the Team Leader or lifeguard on duty may need to inform any staff whose shifts are affected by a lengthy pool closure.

6. Lifeguards inform the Aquatic Coordinator or Programmer about the incident.

7. Lifeguards document the incident by using an accident report.

Makes you think twice about using the public pool, doesn't it?


9:10:29 PM        Mixed Bag Sports

As an avid iPod user and swimmer, I've often considered a waterproof MP3 player for the pool. I read about these MP3 goggles on Gizmodo:

The music player is integrated into swimming goggles and uses bone conduction to vibrate music direct to the skull. The sound quality is actually better than in a normal environment because there is no background noise.

Bone conduction? Does anyone else find that a little...yecch. I can see the headline in five years: 'Sound Waves from Goggles Cause Skull Cancer".

They haven't got a name for this product yet. Let's see...

  • SwimRock
  • PoolPop
  • Nager-Musique

I got nothing.


9:05:48 PM        Music Sports Technology